Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Heat Press Batting Together

Hi all!

I was recently asked to try out and review Heat Press Batting Together a fusible cloth tape for fusing your batting pieces together.  I have to admit at first I was quite skeptical since I can easily sew together batting pieces using a multi-stitch zig-zag on my sewing machine.  However, looking at my sewing job using my sewing machine I always seem to stretch out the batting a bit while I sew it and I have to fan-dangle the batting, after it is sewn, to get it to lay flat again.  So since I had a baby quilt I want to load onto my frame I decided to give the Heat Press Batting Together a try.

I first trimmed up my batting pieces so that they were even instead of jagged edges and laid it on my ironing board.


Lay the tape down across the cut rough side down and quickly press it into place.  This was honestly very fast and very easy.  I used a cotton batting here.


Once you have pressed it down you are ready to go!  So fast - so easy!!


The little blip in the seam was my fault since I didn't push the edges up against each other well enough at first - I thought that I would still show this picture though to show that this can happen if you're not careful ;-)  The seam is smooth and flat and is NOT stretched out at all - like when I stitch mine together using a sewing machine.

So final verdict - this is a great product!  I am definately going to use this product instead of sewing my batting together from now on.  It is much easier, does a better job, is faster and does not put excess lint into my bobbin area of my sewing machine.  Win - win - win!

The only negative I see is that it comes on a small roll with 10 yards of tape on a roll - I would love to see a larger roll of the tape so that I won't have to buy as many ;-)

Have any of you tried Heat Press Batting Together before?

8 comments:

beaquilter said...

I have this and LOVE it, especially for donation quilts etc. seems like I often end up with batting pieces that are 30" wide and can't use them, unless I use THIS. it's tough enough for a long arm too, no problems sideways or lengthwise. Now I just want to know if other iron just one side or two.... one is really enough

Teri said...

I have never seen this before......how much does it cost? Is it stiff at all....

Deb said...

I like this stuff! To make it go a bit further I tend to cut it into chunks - about 4" long - and place them with a 2-4" gap between. And I make sure that I quilt well over the pieced section.

Brenda said...

I've done this with fusible interfacing. how stiff is it? would I be able to hand quilt through it? can you feel it through the layers of the quilt?

SewLindaAnn said...

I've been using some "stitch witchery" rolls I got at a thrift store and it works great. I think any of the iron ons would work great.

Bolts and Bobbins said...

Great product - soft and pliable. I used it in a table runner and I can't find where I've sewn it in.
I've never been very successful at sewing large pieces of batting together - I always get lumps and bumps - this works much better.

ritainalaska said...

i have a roll that i haven't tried yet ... i keep cutting the scraps up for mugrugs. but i have enough scraps to give it a try the next time i layer. thanx for the tutorial. very helpful!

Snoodles said...

I have some of this -- great stuff! It works well, and needles super for us hand-quilters. It's a great value for the price, and shipping is free (or was, when I got mine!). Wonderful seeing a good product get some love!

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